Impact of Family Communication

Family Communication ResearchI think we often underestimate how powerful family talking can be and the impact it can have. As we investigate here at Fink the benefits of talking, we find more and more research that just compounds what we already know – talking really matters.

Family Communication Research

Here is the most recent research I found, that totally blew me away, a study by Hart and Risley in New York.

They were concerned that a massive amount of funding had gone into improving educational achievement and that the results were not as expected. So they did a study into children under 4 and found families in professionals homes spoke 1500 words more per hour than the working class or those on welfare. In a year, this adds up to 8 million words and in 4 years, 32 million words. So by the time the children of professionals got to school, they had heard 32 million more words, which gave them a huge advantage and therefore led to greater achievement.

This just got me thinking, how many of our social issues could be decreased if we only encouraged parents to talk more to their smaller children?

NOTE – This blog post was first posted on our old website. We are launching a new site and wanted to make sure that this content was easy to find.

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Sarah Newton one part of the Family Communication Duo is a eclectic mix of sensitivity, wonder, common sense, wisdom and humour. Known affectionately as the Family Peacemaker Sarah's work spanning over 14 years has seen her on 13 TV stations, 60 different radio stations and has received extensive newspaper and magazine coverage. Called Bubbles by her friends Sarah's day job is Youth Expert, Family Peacemaker, Thought Leader, Blogger, (www.sarahnewton.com) Author, Entrepreneur, geek and crazy chic all rolled into one. The Rest of the time she is a happy mum, loving wife, adventurer and closet 50's Diva. Oh and she also fancies herself as a bit of a Dance floor Diva!

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